Research reports

Ethanol industry coproducts in swine liquid feeding: Aspects on nutritional value, welfare and carcass characteristics of wean-to-finish pigs

Read the complete report: Ethanol industry coproducts in swine liquid feeding: Aspects on nutritional value, welfare and carcass characteristics of wean-to-finish pigs

About this report:

A major ingredient in pig’s feed is corn. The use of corn in ethanol production also results in the generation of byproducts that have the potential to be used for feeding pigs. One byproduct of dry ethanol production is wet corn solubles. In most of the ethanol plants in Minnesota, this byproduct is sprayed on distiller grains to produce distiller grains and solubles (DGS). DGS are then dried to produce Distillers Dried Grains and Solubles (DDGS) to avoid deterioration in quality and to increase keeping quality. However, the drying process is very energy consuming. This study looked at the effects of using a liquid feeding system on the growth rates of pigs.

Conclusions:

In general, this study found that a liquid feeding system was comparable to a dry feeding system when looking at the growth rates of pigs. The study found that the type of feed used, liquid or dry, did not influence the final body weight of the pigs or the average daily gain of the pigs. In addition, pigs fed the wet DDGS tended to consume more feed than pigs fed the dry corn.

Project outcomes:

Ethanol production in Minnesota has provided feedlot operators an opportunity to utilize ethanol coproducts in swine rations. This report will help producers make informed decisions on the use of liquid ethanol coproducts in their wean-to-finish swine diets. It will also help the ethanol industry to minimize the energy requirements of drying their coproducts.

AURI and the University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center partnered to successfully develop a versatile wet feeding system that can handle both wet and dry wastes. The feeding system provides producers with a cost effective option to handle low value co-product feeds in modern swine operations.

This research demonstrates that utilizing corn solubles in swine rations allows producers to reduce production costs without negatively affecting growth performance or carcass quality.

Partners

Minnesota Pork, University of Minnesota, Minnesota Corn

Questions?

For questions or additional information, please contact AURI at 800.279.5010.